Wednesday, November 16, 2022

BIRD STUFF! Bird Supplies We Highly Recommend. Bird Food, Bird Toys, Bird Cage, Bird Warmers, Cuttlebones, Bird Gifts & Ornaments for the Holidays

PAULIE'S PICKS!
BIRD SUPPLIES WE HIGHLY RECOMMEND! Plus...

1st Your Links to Purchase DummyEggs on Amazon.com
for Prime Members with Free 2 Day Shipping

HOLIDAY GIFTS & ORNAMENTS

PAULIE'S PICKS!

CUTTLEBONES FOR CLEAN BEAKS & CALCIUM

XL CUTTLEBONE BULK PACKAGE SHOWN LEFT: Approximately 15 huge 12" long x 1/2" thick fresh Cuttlebones arrive directly from the source per container. It is essential for pet birds to get the calcium and the beak conditioning these natural cuttlefish backbones provide. Many other sellers say they are selling the large size, but they actually send 6"-8" which are considered the small size. Several will arrive broken which simply provides you with 2 nice large chunk pieces, no problem. Do not store in an airtight container. You can punch a hole in a large plastic container and place some dried rice inside to absorb moisture, moisture is the ruination of cuttlebones. Scrape off any stain with a knife. Price has skyrocketed to about $10 each but each will last a long time. Notice how Chickadee, our pied Cockatiel, is eating half a large cuttlebone stuck in between the cage bars horizontally with the soft side down.

Chickadee, pied Cockatiel eating half a large cuttlebone stuck in between the cage bars horizontally with the soft side down.
Calcium & Mineral Block Toy for Any size Bird

K&H CONSTANT WARMING UNITS
My house is freezing in summer. These give me such peace of mind Paulie can get close to a perfect 104℉

Our Note: The small perch is great for sizes up to African Grey or Amazon Parrot. 
From seller: PROTECTION: Protect exotic birds from the harmful effects of air conditioning and cold drafts PERFECT TEMPERATURE: Thermostatically controlled to an optimum body temperature for birds to snuggle up to LOW VOLTAGE: Uses harmless 12-volt, low voltage electricity to heat the bird warmer and is easy to clean SAFETY: Safe, consistent source of warmth, stabilizes the bird's environment HEALTH: Can reduce avian stress contributing to good health BRAND YOU TRUST: Designed by K&H with OVER 20 years of experience in creating innovative, safe, quality products, and is backed by a K&H one year warranty

LEFEBER'S CLASSIC NUTRIBERRIES BIRD FOOD
With a high percentage of pellet nutrition and a nutty crunchy exterior, the best of both worlds. Paulie gobbles them up.

3.25 - 4 LB tubs of healthy tasty food bird's love. Lots of nutritional pellet content in a nutty crunchy ball. Available at Lefeber Store in other sizes. Bird pictured on cover denotes size of pellet, i.e. Budgie Parkakeet, Cockatiel, Sun Conure, Amazon Parrot, and Macaw & Cockatoo.

FANTASTIC FOOD FOR COCKATIEL,
BUDGERIGAR BUDGIE / AMERICAN PARAKEET
& OTHER SMALL AUSTRALIAN BIRDS
A PELLETED BASE WITH LOTS OF SEEDS & FRUIT FOR TASTE & INTEREST

Here we see a cage full of Budgies chowing down on their Goldenfeast Australian Blend Bird Food. So comforting to know they are getting a balanced diet they love.


Great Treats for Birds & Parrots

These NutriBerries are in a variety package with 4 different flavors. They have a lot less pellet content so I mix them in with the classic for added interest. Paulie likes all these flavors, Tropical Fruit, El Paso, Sunny Orchard and Garden Veggie, especially El Paso with dried peppers.

Both of these Kaytee treats, Kaytee Yo Dips Mango Flavored Treat for Parrots and Large Birds & Kaytee Strawberr/Banana Flavor Yogurt Dipped Treat For All Pet Birds, 3.5 Oz. have been our very special go to tailfeather wagging treats for many years. Although Kaytee says it is for large parrots, our Cockatiels loved them too.

Freshest, Biggest, Best Millet You Can Buy
A Must for All Birds!

5 lb. Great Fresh Nemeth Farms Millet from Canada. 
Best to purchase when harvested at end of year.  Here's Paulie enjoying a golden millet spray.

WORKS GREAT AS A FOOD OR WATER DISH.
LiXit BIRD BATH

This is my favorite cage accessory. Translucent light blue attracts birds like a pool of water... while letting you see inside. Secure cage attachment works well on most cages. Here is little Chickadee, the Cockatiel, taking a bath in her water dish and another picture of our Blue Fronted Amazon, Paulie's cage with 3 across holding her salad, water and nuts. As you can see, Lixit bath and feeders are Paulie Approved.

Blue fronted Amazon, Paulie, holds package of Lixit blue acrylic bath and feeder.

Monday, September 19, 2022

Bird Egg Chart by Species, DummyEggs Size, Clutch & Incubation, Which Dummy Eggs to Buy for Birds

My Bird Laid an Egg, What Do I Do Now?

Simple Trick! Plastic DummyEggs Stop Egg Laying
Safe, Fast, Naturally!
DummyEggs Brand for Sale, Buy Here
We ship same or next day USPS 1st class with tracking.

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.COM

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Bird Egg Chart by Species: Dummy Egg Size, Clutch Size & Number of Days of Incubation

Which Dummy Eggs to Buy for Birds,
How Many Eggs to Put In Their Nest
& How Long to Leave Them.

For a free copy of our instruction sheet, please email with your request to: info@dummyeggs.com

DUMMYEGGS®
 INFO CHART

CLICK PICTURE
TO ORDER
ON
DUMMYEGGS.COM

 

SPECIES 

CLICK LINK
TO ORDER
ON
DUMMYEGGS.COM

DUMMY EGG SIZE

Length x Width

AVG. CLUTCH
How many eggs in nest
AVG. INCUB-ATION
How long to leave in nest

Buy FINCH
DummyEggs Here

5/8 x 1/2"
(17 x 13mm)

5

12

3 canaries and 7 Blue green speckled Canary Eggs DummyEggs.com logo Yellow directions


Buy CANARY DummyEggs Here

11/16 x 1/2"
(17.6 x 14mm)

5

14

ParrotletAm. Parakeet Budgie (Budgerigar) Diamond Dove eggs

5
5
2

23
18
14

LovebirdLineoleated Parakeet, Bourke's ParakeetEnglish Show Budgie eggs

5
4
6

23
21
18

Cockatiel, QuakerGreen Cheek ConureLorikeetRingneck Dove  Eggs

Buy Cockatiel DummyEggs Here

Buy Quaker Parrot DummyEggs Here

Buy Green Cheek DummyEggs Here

Buy Lorikeet DummyEggs Here 

Buy Ringneck Dove DummyEggs Here

1 x 3/4"
(24 x 20mm)

6
5
2
2

19
23
19
14

Conure, Caique, Indian Ringneck, Monk Parakeet, Pionus, Senegal,Rosella, Red Bellied, Jardine, Meyer's Hahn's Macaw Egg

SMALL PARROT EGGS

Buy Conure DummyEggs Here

Buy Caique DummyEggs Here

Buy Senegal DummyEggs Here

Buy Indian Ringneck DummyEggs Here

Buy Hahn’s & Noble Macaw DummyEggs Here

1-1/4 x 1"
(3.2 x 2.5cm)

4

24
24
24
25

African GreyAmazon ParrotEclectus. Mini Macaw, CockatooPigeon

 Buy African Grey DummyEggs Here

Buy Amazon Parrot DummyEggs Here

Buy Eclectus DummyEggs Here

Buy Small Macaw DummyEggs Here 

Buy Small Cockatoo DummyEggs Here

Buy Pigeon DummyEggs Here

1.5 x 1- 1/16"
(3.7 x 3cm)

4
3
2
2
2

29
28
30
25
14

Macaw, Hyacinth,Umbrella Cockatoo Egg

Buy Macaw, Hyacinth DummyEggs Here

Buy Umbrella Cockatoo DummyEggs Here

1-7/8 x 1-1/2"
(4.8 x 3.8cm)

2
2

28
25

© DummyEggs.com

THE DUMMYEGGS® INFO CHART
This chart gives you the dimensions of our plastic dummy eggs to compare with your birds' egg size, if you have one. It is safe to order by species as listed below except for a few special situations: 

A few special situations: if you have a Green Cheek Conure, being a very small parrot, the female bird uses our 1" x 3/4" "Cockatiel" size. Ringneck Doves can match up with the 1" or the 1-1/4" "Small Parrot Egg," depending on the size of the bird. A small Cockatoo, like a Galah or small Macaw, such as Military, will match with our Medium Parrot size. Large 1-7/8" solid plastic eggs are used for the largest parrots like Umbrella Cockatoo, or Hyacinth and Green Wing Macaw. Most of the other species are pretty straight forward and you will succeed using the recommended size. 

All our dummy eggs, except finch, have the same egg shape. Many people think they need the egg to be a little rounder or a little longer to match perfectly, but this matters little to your bird. Birds will incubate just about anything that resembles an egg when in a brooding mood. Large parrots display hormonal behavior a bit more than the smaller ones who lay more eggs more often.

Can I return or exchange DummyEggs? We know it is hard to guess the right size of your bird’s egg, especially if you do not have a real one to measure. The fastest method is to simply order another set of the right size for your bird. E-mail me with your new order and I will send along a return envelope.

Friday, September 16, 2022

DummyEggs Mission: Prevent & Protect Homeless Birds

“Prevent & Protect Homeless Birds”
DummyEggs is dedicated to helping the
 homeless birds of the USA by donating
3% of gross sales to avian shelters and rescues.


DummyEggs.com VIDEO HOLIDAY CARD, Videos and uTube Playlist.

Please Enjoy Our Happy Holiday Card

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DummyEggs.com 30 Second Commercial

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CHECK OUT OUR VIDEOS PLAYLIST ON UTUBE
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Have you ever wondered if Pet Insurance was worthwhile?
We strongly recommend having pet insurance for any bird that lays eggs.
Not all companies offer policies for birds. We have found Nationwide Pet Insurance, at PetInsurance.com to be an excellent company who does offer "exotic pet insurance." Not only for birds, but for horses, reptiles and rodents as well. Our monthly premium for our Amazon parrot is only $14.25. A small price to pay when a visit to your avian veterinarian can run in the hundreds, especially in an emergency.
We do not receive any commission from this referral.


WHAT EVERY BIRD OWNER SHOULD KNOW:
THE TRUTH ABOUT NESTING BEHAVIOR

Coming Soon!

Thursday, September 15, 2022

About DummyEggs.com - Our Philosophy - DummyEggs for Sale

DUMMYEGGS® for Sale

Replace unwanted eggs with realistic DUMMYEGGS®

• REALISTIC • SOLID PLASTIC • NON-TOXIC • REUSABLE FAKE BIRD EGGS

WEIGHTED LIKE REAL EGGS

DummyEggs.com Logo

THIS PAGE HAS OPENED IN A NEW WINDOW.
TO RETURN TO DUMMYEGGS.COM RETURN TO OPEN WINDOW


  DUMMY EGGS • FAKE EGGS 
• DECOY EGGS • PLASTIC EGGS
• IMMITATION EGGS • FAUX EGGS

YOUR BIRD WON'T KNOW THE DIFFERENCE

Control Egg Laying! Fast, Safely, Naturally!

For a free copy of our instruction sheet, please email with your request to: info@dummyeggs.com


Our Philosophy
"DummyEggs® cannot stop mother nature... just try to guide her a little. At DummyEggs® our point of view is to give her a nest simulation so she can behave normally. There are no health concerns with a healthy hen who is laying normal natural eggs for reproduction. Dummy eggs cannot stop your bird from ever laying another egg which would not be healthy. Don’t deprive your bird of basic comforts that are often advised, as added stress is not what she needs. Give her the eggs to sit on as nature intended. Controlled egg laying helps to curtail the current crisis of over population and homelessness of pet birds."― Melanie

WHY & HOW DummyEggs® WORK

Control Egg Laying! Fast, Safely, Naturally. The DummyEggs® Brand fake bird eggs, provide an efficient, fast, and natural tool to control unwanted breeding and egg laying in birds of all sizes. Our realistic, solid white, non-toxic plastic eggs, are modeled after real bird eggs, are made in the USA, and can be used again and again. You can find the right dummy eggs for your bird by measuring a real egg or choosing by species. DummyEggs® bird egg reproductions are used to control egg laying by replacing live eggs and simulating a full clutch of eggs. Make sure you provide her with enough eggs to turn off the hormones. 

Please read our important directions included with your order carefully, there is a lot of information provided for your success in using DUMMY EGGS. 

The Topics Covered Are:

• Where can I find DummyEggs® brand eggs for sale?

DummyEggs.com

eBay DummyEggs Store

Amazon.com DummyEggs USA

• How Do Dummy Eggs Stop Egg Laying in pet parrots & birds?

• Are non-toxic solid plastic fake eggs safe and what are DummyEggs® made of?

• What do I do with real unwanted eggs that my parrot or bird have laid?

• How many dummy eggs do I put in her cage or nest at once?

• How long before the egg laying cycle starts over again?

• When do I remove the DummyEggs® from my bird’s cage or nest?

• How does my bird behave when she is getting ready to lay eggs?

• Can plastic dummy eggs work to replace both fertile and infertile eggs?

• Can Dummy Eggs help serious avian health conditions like chronic egg laying or egg binding?

• Will a fake egg stimulate a hen to start laying a clutch of eggs?

• How do I know what egg size I need for my pet bird such as: Finch, Budgies or Parakeets, Canary, Lovebirds, Parrotlets, Cockatiels, Green Cheek Conures, Sun Conures, Indian Ringnecks, African Greys, Eclectus, Amazon Parrots, Macaws and Cockatoos?

Designed and manufactured in the USA exclusively by DummyEggs®
#1 Choice of Avian Veterinarians

Since 2006



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Thursday, September 1, 2022

OUR STORY: HOW DUMMYEGGS STARTED

 

OUR STORY: 
How & Why DummyEggs® Began



DummyEggs.com grew out of our own total confusion when our bonded pair of Cockatiels laid fertile eggs at a time when we could not spend time caring for a needy clutch of chicks. We searched the newly burgeoning internet and found an occasional post about using fake eggs to replace the real ones. Finding plastic eggs became an enormous challenge. Egg laying is an important subject that no one wants to talk about and surprises many pet owners who are at a loss as to what to do when it happens.

That was in 2006, when Melanie & Kirk started DummyEggs.com as a one page website to sell the 3 sizes of plastic eggs they were able to import from Europe. After that, we resourced many different size eggs from various undependable sources. Finally in 2014, we contracted an injection molding company and manufactured our own dummy eggs.

Now, 15 years later, 2021, the use and existence of dummy eggs to help control breeding is well known. Avian Veterinarians recommend our site to clients on a regular basis. DummyEggs.com has helped veterinarians deal with frantic bird owners whose hen has done what hens naturally do... lay eggs.

With dummy eggs now available for all size pet birds, people who care for the health of their precious birds can quickly and easily find information on what to do when their bird lays an egg. The worst thing you can do for your bird is just throw the egg(s) away. This forces them to quickly replace the missing egg(s) draining their bodies of vital calcium and nutrients which in turn can cause devasting effects such as egg binding and calcium deficiency. Life threatening symptoms that do require an avian veterinarian immediately.

Common advise is often to make your bird feel less secure, less comfortable because hens won't lay if they feel threatened or food insecure. Our philosophy has always been to give them what they really want, A FULL CLUTCH OF EGGS. This is when nature signals to stop laying more eggs. Birds count their eggs! A bowl of dummy eggs simulate a full clutch of eggs that your hen can sit on until she looses interest. She feels fulfilled and you are in control. So simple! So healthy! If you follow our directions, they can work like magic!


Sincerely,
Melanie & Kirk

 

Wednesday, July 6, 2022

The Vet's Advice. Medical Complications from Egg Laying & Behavior Modification for Broody Birds.

THE VET'S ADVICE

It is usually quite the surprise to parrot owners when their pet lays an egg, especially if they thought it was a male, or if it lives without a mate. Just like with production chickens laying eggs for consumption, any single bird will become reproductively active and can lay an unfertilized egg during its life in captivity. This article will focus on some key points to help explain the answers to the most frequently asked questions our clients have regarding this behavior including: why it happens, possible harmful complications, what to do when it happens, and how to prevent it from happening over and over again. Since reproductive disorders are common in pet birds, prevention and self-education are better than treatment, especially since some of these conditions can be life-threatening.

Why did my bird lay an egg when there is no mate present?

Egg laying can start whenever the species becomes sexually mature and can continue throughout the bird’s lifetime. Some birds will lay only once or twice in their lives, others will lay several times a year depending on the home environment and stimuli. In the wild many natural factors influence egg-laying and female parrots will generally not lay eggs unless they have a mate, a suitable nesting site, and the right environmental conditions and food availability. Their reproductive behaviors are often guided by food abundance and seasonal changes such as daylight hours. In captivity however, this behavior is often stimulated by other factors we may not even be aware we are providing. Some companion birds are more prolific and much more likely to lay eggs than other species based on genetic predisposition, such as budgies/parakeets, cockatiels, and Aratinga conures. Others can randomly lay due to the stimulants we provide in captivity. Some of these stimulants include:

·         Increased daylight hours: when birds think it is springtime, they are more likely to reproduce. When we wake them up early and keep them up with us at night, they don’t understand that our artificial light is not the sun and they can become reproductively active.

·         Constant sources of rich foods: when birds have ample foods high in fat and protein, their bodies become prepared to reproduce. In the wild, they reproduce when these kinds of natural resources are available based on the season. In captivity, when they are given these rich foods every day, their bodies are constantly ready and amped up for reproduction!

·         Inappropriate pair bonding with humans or inanimate objects: when birds perceive that there is a mate present, their bodies will think it’s time to make babies. An inappropriate mate is most often a chosen person in the home- often someone who allows the bird to physically be with them more than others, allows regurgitation behaviors, and is very affectionate. Occasionally this perceived mate could also be a mirror, a stuffed animal, or a favorite toy that the bird cuddles with, regurgitates on, or spends many hours a day with.

·         Excessive allopreeing: it is very rewarding to have a bird that enjoys being scratched, rubbed, and will reciprocate with straightening our hair or giving sweet nibbles. However, this behavior directly mimics what parrots and their mates do in the wild. Scratching under the wings, over the back, under the chin, and around the face/beak are all behaviors of bonded pairs of parrots in the wild. Doing this can encourage reproductive behavior such as egg laying.

·         Having access to a nesting sites: of course purchasing a nest for a bird is an obvious nesting site, but often people don’t realize that allowing a bird to forage/play in a cardboard box, offering the fuzzy tents sold in pet stores, allowing them to explore the kitchen cabinets, or burrowing in our clothes/bed linens are all nesting sites as well! In the wild, birds seek out small, dark spaces to make a nest such as a tree hollow or rock crevice. There are many of these “sites” in our homes and allowing birds to find them can induce them to lay eggs sometimes in these sites.

What are the potential complications?

1. Eggbinding: When birds lay eggs, they need to be in optimal condition in order to be able to produce the protein required, the calcium to shell the egg, and the energy to lay it properly. A poor quality diet for a bird that is not exposed to natural sunlight (to aid in calcium absorption) and that does not fly or have exercise may be deficient in many nutrients and vitamins and be in poor body conditon that is required for healthy egg laying. If the eggs are not shelled properly, they could be soft or lump or, they could have difficulty or even get stuck moving through the oviduct. If the bird does not have good muscle development or calcium stores, passing the egg may be difficult or impossible. These conditions can cause dystocia, or “egg binding” in birds. Birds that are having difficulty laying eggs may have the following symptoms:

·         Sitting on the bottom of the cage

·         Difficulty breathing, which can appear like a tail bob, open beak panting, or a wide-legged stance with increased respiratory effort

·         Blood coming from the vent (the opening where they poop from and where the egg passes)

·         Straining or pushing excessively with no egg produced
Pathologic bone fractures: When birds produce eggs, their bodies mobilize calcium from their bones, leaving them weak. Over time it is common to see fractured wings and/or leg bones occurring with no trauma, especially if they are not getting enough calcium and vitamin D3.

2. Egg yolk peritonitis: If there is reproductive disease, either from chronic egg laying or pathology in the oviduct, ovarian follicles can develop and instead of passing into the oviduct to be shelled normally, they fall into the body cavity. This can cause a serious inflammatory process that causes the coelom (abdomen) to fill with fluid. This can be very uncomfortable for birds, causing them to not be able to breathe well, become lethargic, and have a decreased appetite.

3. Hyperlipidemia: When birds are constantly laying eggs, there is often a high amount of circulating fats and proteins in the blood to facilitate egg production. This can cause dangerous thickening of the blood, with the potential to cause a bird to have a stroke (sometimes referred to as “yolk stroke”). These changes in the blood are often impossible to change with diet and exercise, and in many cases only hormone therapy or spaying will stop the condition.

4. Behavior problems: When birds are in a state of reproduction, they often have hormonal changes that make them irritable and uncomfortable. They can turn from a human-friendly buddy, to a vicious cage protective demon! Birds will often aggressively protect their eggs and/or nest area by lunging, hissing, biting, and screaming. They also will sometimes pull feathers from their body to make a nest (called a “brood patch”) in order to keep the eggs warm with their skin contact on them. But this behavior can preclude chronic feather picking behavior.

What do I do now that my bird laid an egg?

These recommendations are based on the assumption that you are not trying to breed your bird. The staff at the Center strongly discourages breeding of pet parrots, especially by non-experienced pet owners. If you are trying to breed, please consider discussing this with your avian veterinarian prior to breeding to learn about the potential for health problems, financial expense, and ethical reasons why we do not recommend breeding parrots.

A few species of parrots are sexually dimorphic (you can tell the gender based on the physical appearance) and others are not, so many owners don’t know if they have a male or a female. (We strongly recommend bringing birds in for testing BEFORE a crisis occurs, we can easily determine the gender with a single drop of blood.) If you have a male and female, or are not sure, it is possible that the egg could be fertile, so as soon as you see an egg, you should remove it and replace it with a fake egg. 

Alternatively, you could boil or freeze the egg, but then return it to the nest. It is important to return some sort of egg to the nest because some birds will continue to lay eggs, trying to replace the lost ones. Once the eggs of a clutch are all laid and exchanged for fake or sterilized eggs, leave them with the birds, regardless if they are nesting them or not, for approximately 3 weeks. Then, remove them one at a time every other day until they are gone. This will hopefully give the female the time she needs to understand that those eggs are not viable and will not hatch. In most cases the birds will abandon the eggs after a period of time.

While she is laying/nesting on the eggs, be sure to communicate with your avian veterinarian regarding diet and possible nutritional supplementations. Each situation may be different based on history, species, diet, and other variables. Your pet’s doctor may recommend extra calcium, full spectrum light, protein, or other supplements during this time.

If you see any symptoms as described above, please give your avian veterinarian a call right away to schedule an appointment, or potentially bring your bird in for an emergency visit. These situations can be very dangerous and life threatening so you should not wait.

Tips to prevent pet parrots from laying eggs

1. Move the bird’s cage to a different area of your home. Sometimes making birds feel a little uncomfortable will make their bodies recognize that it is not an ideal time to lay eggs.


2. Rearrange any perches, bowls, and toys in the cage. Again, making them feel just a bit like things are different or strange, less comfortable, they may not be as likely to lay eggs.


3. Remove any objects that your bird associates with “nesting”. These are usually cardboard boxes or fabric toys that your bird can “hide” in. Food bowls are also often used as make-shift nests and changing sizes and location may limit this behavior.


4. Remove any objects that your bird considers a “mate” such as mirrors, stuffed toys, special favorite perches, or even other birds. Sometimes birds may need a time-out from a mate or a perceived mate in order to prevent chronic egg laying.


5. Limit time with the bird’s human “mate”. Avoid bonding behaviors like grooming, kissing, and sharing food.


6. If your bird spends a lot of time out of its cage, discourage all nesting behavior. You may need to keep the bird caged for a while to prevent them from laying eggs in closets, behind/under furniture, or in cabinets.


7. Alter your bird’s light/dark schedule by covering the cage for at least 12 hours a night. Keeping them quiet and dark during these hours will create a sense that it is not springtime and not the time for making babies.


8. Keep your bird away from direct, bright sunlight during the day. It also may help to keep them away from windows and in a normally lit room.

If you are concerned that your bird may be having difficulty laying eggs, or if your bird just needs an annual checkup please visit an avian veterinarian right away.


Republished with thanks from 

What Do I Do? My Bird Laid An Egg… What Do I Do?

avianandexoticvets.com